APH offers fourth dose of COVID-19 vaccine to individuals aged 60 and over


First Nation, Métis, and Inuit individuals and their non-Indigenous household members aged 18 and over are also eligible

Algoma Public Health will be offering a fourth dose of COVID-19 vaccines to individuals aged 60 and over, as well as First Nation, Métis, and Inuit individuals and their non-Indigenous household members aged 18 and over.

COVID-19 vaccines are available at local pharmacies, Indigenous-led clinics, or select primary care offices, and APH vaccination clinics also accept walk-ins.

Appointments can be booked online or by phone.

For more information, please see the press release included below.

Algoma now offering fourth doses of the COVID-19 vaccine to eligible groups

The Ontario government has expanded eligibility for fourth doses of the COVID-19 vaccine to individuals aged 60 and over as well as First Nation, Métis, and Inuit individuals and their non-Indigenous household members aged 18 and over. Expanding booster eligibility provides an extra layer of protection against the Omicron and BA.2 variants and, in addition to antiviral treatments, is another tool the province is using to live with and manage COVID-19.

Eligibility and interval

Fourth doses are being offered to eligible individuals at a recommended interval of five months (140 days) after receiving their last booster dose (3rd dose).

Moderna for those aged 30+ and eligible for a fourth dose

Due to current supply, Algoma Public Health will administer Moderna as a fourth dose to patients aged 30+.

People who are aged 18-29 will continue to be offered Pfizer, as it is the recommended product for this age group.

The National Advisory Committee on Immunization, a Canadian agency that makes informed recommendations for the use of vaccines in Canada, states that the mixing of COVID-19 vaccine brands is safe and effective. Both Moderna and Pfizer vaccines use a similar mRNA technology. The vaccines are interchangeable and safe to mix to stay up-to-date with your COVID-19 vaccine series.

Vaccine interchangeability or mixing doses is not a new practice in public health. Different vaccine products are routinely used to complete vaccine series. In addition, many Ontarians and local residents received a safe and effective mixed dose primary series of COVID-19 vaccine.

Clinics in Algoma

To view all of the clinics taking place in Algoma, visit Vaccine Clinics in Algoma. You can also continue to receive your COVID-19 vaccine from local pharmacies, Indigenous-led clinics, or select primary care offices.

All COVID-19 clinics hosted by Algoma Public Health across the Algoma district are accepting walk-ins. Scheduled appointments will still be available for those who would prefer to book an appointment with a dedicated time.

Appointments can be booked online or by phone. To book by phone, call 705-541-7370 or Toll Free: 1-888-440-3730 (Monday – Friday, 9 am – 4 pm).

Importance of staying up-to-date on immunizations

Vaccination remains the best defense against COVID-19, including the Omicron and BA.2 variants, and you are strongly encouraged to get a fourth dose as soon as you are eligible.

The protection provided from your primary vaccine series decreases over time. Booster doses help to increase your protection against symptomatic infection and severe outcomes, while helping to reduce transmission at the population level.

If you have questions about the COVID-19 vaccines, speak with a trusted healthcare professional who can answer your questions (eg your family doctor, a nurse at a vaccine clinic, etc.). You can also visit Scarborough Health Networks VaxFacts to book a free phone consult with a doctor to get your questions about COVID-19 vaccines answered.

Need a ride?

Free transportation is available to access COVID-19 vaccine clinics in Sault Ste. Married. Call PUC Services at 705-759-6522 once you know the clinic you will be attending and they will help you book safe, free transportation to and from your appointment. Accessible transportation is also available.



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